Isfahan

Chasing the Dream: Two Women Traveling in Iran

Madi Jahangir* –  “Iranians and Italians are so much alike. In the good and in the bad!” Angela’s emphasis on the good and the bad made me laugh aloud every time and laughter was what made our trip even more fun.

Our two weeks traveling in Iran officially ended few days ago when my friend and fellow travel writer Angela of Chasing the Unexpected flew back to Rome, Italy and I took the night bus to northern Iran. So far as being two women coming from two of the world’s first civilizations, we were not really surprised to realize that the two nations share a lot in the matter of culture and lifestyle. Perhaps one of the major traits that Iranians share with Italians is to keep that crazy sense of humor, to cheer oneself up at the time of frustrating long distances.  Continue reading

Isfahan: Iran’s Hidden Jewel

Andrew Lawler * – The courtyard is coated in a fine brown dust, the surrounding walls are crumbling and the flaking plaster is the same monotonous khaki color as the ground. This decrepit house in a decaying maze of narrow alleys in Isfahan, Iran, betrays little of the old capital’s glory days in the 17th century. Suddenly, a paint-splattered worker picking at a nearby wall shouts, waves his steel trowel and points. Underneath a coarse layer of straw and mud, a faded but distinct array of blue, green and yellow abstract patterns emerges—a hint of the dazzling shapes and colors that once made this courtyard dance in the shimmering sun. Continue reading

A Trip to Mesr: The Island in the Sea of Sands

 Dr Ali Sabaghian * – What do you recall when you hear “Mesr”? The Arabic name of Egypt, a country in north Africa? Nile river, Pyramids, Sphinx and Pharaohs? You are right. But you would be surprised to know, there’s another Mesr too, but thousands of kilometers away from current Egypt, and tens of kilometers away from any crowded city. A small island in the sand, somewhere in the heart of Iran’s central desert, Mesr is name of an Iranian village  in Khur and Biabanak county, close to city of Naein which is famous for agricultural production in the area. ¹

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Iran’s Wonders: The World Records in Tourism Attractions

‘The most…’ has been always an enticing description to human beings. This description is the main reason which has made a lot of tourists and travelers put Iran on their itinerary. Being described by “the most” is so attractive that many people are trying to make their country be known by it in various ways. For example, a tower is built at a point in the world to be the tallest tower in the world in order to become renowned as such and attract many tourists. Continue reading

The Most Beautiful Mosques in Iran: Part1

Dignified, magnificent and impressive. The arches, tilework mosaics and the very round domes are the post Islamic method of building structures in Iran. However, Iranian architecture has a history from at least 5000 BC to the present which significiently inspired the architecture in Insia, Turkey and Tajikistan to Zanzibar: “The supreme Iranian art, in the proper meaning of the word, has always been its architecture. The supremacy of architecture applies to both pre-and post-Islamic periods.” Says Arthur Pope, a pioneering American expert on Iranian art. Continue reading

A glimpse on Iran’s private side: The Abbasian House in Kashan

Angela Corrias *– Before getting to beautiful Abyaneh, the guys of the Unified Ummah, the NGO that invited me to Iran, planned a stop in Kashan, ancient oasis city dating back to the 4th century BC that offers to visitors the priceless view of typical desert architecture. At about 228km away from Tehran, Kashan is a must-stop as it gives the great opportunity to take a peek on Iran’s private side by visiting a local house. Continue reading

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