Eid Al Fitr in Iran: Practicing Religious Harmony

Madi Jahangir * – Abyunaki people arrive from every corner of the village to a place close to the graveyard, Women in their typical white long scarf which has a colorful pattern of flowers and men in their very loose pants. In Abyaneh, Eid Al Fitr is a time to meet up after the Eid prayer, chat little bit and drink juice. 

Eid Al Fitr in Abyaneh, Isfahan province / Photo: Mahdi Marizad

Eid Al Fitr in Abyaneh, Isfahan province / Photo: Mahdi Marizad

Eid Al Fitr marks the end of the month of Ramadan, a feast celebrated by muslims around the world after a month of fasting from drinks, food, and sexual activity from sunrise to sunset. In Iran, the multi ethnic and multi cultural country, this muslim feast is celebrated all over the country with various traditions.  The holiday is a two days in most part of Iran and stretches to 3 days in Khuzistan province.

Eid Al Fitr prayer in Azadshahr, Golestan province / Photo: Moein Motlagh

Eid Al Fitr prayer in Azadshahr, Golestan province / Photo: Moein Motlagh

Iranians in Khuzistan, hold ceremonies as glamorous as the Iranian new year, wear new clothes and give gifts to each other. They visit the elders of the family and specially those families who lost loved ones in the past year. Visiting relatives in group is another old tradition in Khuzistan which is nowadays practiced in villages only. When someone is going to visit a relative, he may meet some other people on the way and they greet and join each other, together heading to the destination. This way, sometimes 200 people arrive at a house for Eid visit. The guests are offered cinnamon and Saffron welcome drinks. Last day of Ramadan is the day of the deceased too and people give away charity.

Iranian turkmen celebrate Eid al fitr / Photo: Ehsan Kamali

Iranian turkmen in Northern Khorasan celebrate Eid al fitr / Photo: Ehsan Kamali

The tradition of giving away charity for the deceased is practiced differently in Yazd. In this ancient city located in the central Iran, the traditions have often hundreds of years history.  After the morning prayer, people in Yazd do not eat breakfast and wait for the sunrise. Then they go to the mosques and give the fitriyyah ( Eid charity). Only there and then, they eat the welcome breakfast prepared by the mosque. After the Eid prayer, they often go to the graveyards and pray for the dead and recite Quran.

People walking in the streets close to Tehran university to participate in Eid Al Fitr prayer / Photo: Abuzar Bazri

People gather to participate in Eid Al Fitr prayer in Rasht, Guilan province/ Photo: Abuzar Bazri

In Bafq, a city close to Yazd, last day of Ramadan is the day of sorrow for not being able to participate in ‘God’s feast’. Instead the following day which is the Eid Al Fitr, people celebrate by wearing new clothes and prepare themselves for the Eid prayer and visits. Eid prayers are held all over Iran from Azerbaijan to the up north to Zahedan in the South East.  In some cities like Bushehr, people gather at the house of the Friday Imam, accompany him to the mosque among cheers and salawats while handing out sweets and candy.

Eid al Fitr prayer at Tehran university / Photo: Abuzar Bazri

Eid al Fitr prayer at Tehran university / Photo: Abuzar Bazri

The Eid prayer in Tehran, the capital of Iran is led by the Supreme Leader in Tehran university. The streets around Tehran university turn to sidewalks, because cars are not allowed to pass through. Though even they would want to, they couldn’t with all the crowd filling the streets. For having a better place in the rows of prayer, people walk to Tehran university from very early seconds after sunrise. Iranians from every walk of life and social class, different appearance, children, men, women, old and young participate in Eid prayer. What i like about Tehran is this collection of paradoxes, each belongs to his own world, culture and background, but gather to participate in a religious ceremony together. After the start of prayer, the differences do not matter. What is seen from above, are thousands of people raising hands in front of their face for supplication, bending and standing together, practicing their religion so harmonically, men in their colorful shirts and women in their flowery prayer clothes.

* Madi Jahangir is Editor in chief at Dream of Iran. Visit us @DreamofIran and our Facebook Page

One Response to Eid Al Fitr in Iran: Practicing Religious Harmony

  • Roxanna says:

    Greetings! Very helpful advice within this post!
    It is the little changes that will make the greatest changes.
    Thanks for sharing!

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